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14 September 2007 @ 01:21 pm
Debunking time  
Think organic food/farming is healthier and friendlier to the environment? think again.
 
 
 
Brandonprice on September 14th, 2007 11:16 pm (UTC)
You're overstating. While the benefits of organic produce are negligible, the benefits of organically grown meat (in particular, beef) is well supported. Organic meats contain a much more favorable balance of omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acids than grain-fed beef.
Miusherimiusheri on September 14th, 2007 11:39 pm (UTC)
I'll admit that I have never heard of organic meat. I have no idea what it is, or how it's different from, uh... non-organic meat. (That sounds funny ^_^) Any articles/sites I could look at?
How Random Babbling Becomes Corporate Policyt3knomanser on September 15th, 2007 12:27 am (UTC)
Of course, grazing is horrible for the environment. Grain feeding is only slightly better. Meat in general is very expensive in terms of ecological resources.

But it's yummy.
Chia de Boskchiasmushf on September 15th, 2007 01:50 am (UTC)
That post is worth it just for the comments. They take a while to get rolling, but ultimately, it builds up to this gem:

Not that much shit is "designed" Stop hitting the bong and get a real life interacting with the planet, it's plants and critters directly. Then you might have an authentic thought. Until then, you are just a bitch to your ganga pipe dream.
Chia de Boskchiasmushf on September 15th, 2007 01:56 am (UTC)
My opinion, BTW, is pretty simple: the fruits & veggies I buy from the farmer's market or my local organic co-op taste a lot better than the stuff I get from the grocery store. The nutritional value of processed food (e.g. cereal) at Whole Foods is substantially better than the nutritional value of the equivalent food at Cub. And even if pesticides and chemically-laden food haven't been proven to be bad for you, they're certainly not good for you, so I'm not concerned one way or the other about cutting them out of my diet. So, ultimately, I like the organic stuff for a lot of reasons other than environmental freak-outs.

As for it being unsustainable/inefficient -- when organically grown food gets common enough that MN isn't able to produce cheapish food, I'll start to worry about that. But as of right now, our farmers are surviving through government-inflated prices. So a little inefficiency doesn't really hurt anyone, as far as I'm concerned.
How Random Babbling Becomes Corporate Policyt3knomanser on September 16th, 2007 10:49 pm (UTC)
Quote:
the fruits & veggies I buy from the farmer's market or my local organic co-op taste a lot better than the stuff I get from the grocery store.
I am curious as to the actual veracity of that. I hear that a lot- but I haven't found that to be consistently true. Often, a farmer's market provides fresher produce- and that will certainly always taste better.

As for farmers in the US- well, yes. But there are organizations that push this dead-end agricultural model on developing countries. Even outside of agriculture, thousands of people die each year from malaria that could have been prevented if not for banning DDT (which wasn't thinning the eggs of bald eagles anyway). That is a problem.

The other problem is the general problem of bunkum. Organic farming is a scam, profiting off the misapprehensions of well-meaning people. It's charging a premium so people can feel better about themselves based on what are lies.

Finally- so much arable land in the US lies fallow, thanks to artificially inflated prices. And so many people world-wide starve to death. Sure, here, we can waste resources on organic farming. But if we really allowed the free market to operate and removed farm subsidies- that wouldn't be the case. We'd be exporting food by the gigaton, and a lot more people would be eating.
Chia de Boskchiasmushf on September 17th, 2007 12:16 am (UTC)
If they just taste better because they're fresher, then that's fine by me -- they still taste better. And if they just seems to taste better, than that's still fine by me -- I still get the experience of the food tasting better, even if the actual objective sensory measurements might deem otherwise. To this extent, I'm kind of like Mr. Reagan in "The Matrix".

As for farmers in the US- well, yes. But there are organizations that push this dead-end agricultural model on developing countries. Even outside of agriculture, thousands of people die each year from malaria that could have been prevented if not for banning DDT (which wasn't thinning the eggs of bald eagles anyway). That is a problem.
These are problems outside of the realm of my local organic farms.

The other problem is the general problem of bunkum. Organic farming is a scam, profiting off the misapprehensions of well-meaning people. It's charging a premium so people can feel better about themselves based on what are lies.
Then don't buy them. But you seem like a free-market kinda person: if someone can make a buck on misapprehensions, then why shouldn't you let them?

Finally- so much arable land in the US lies fallow, thanks to artificially inflated prices. And so many people world-wide starve to death. Sure, here, we can waste resources on organic farming. But if we really allowed the free market to operate and removed farm subsidies- that wouldn't be the case. We'd be exporting food by the gigaton, and a lot more people would be eating.

...except that those people don't really have the money to buy the food at a rate which is sufficient to support the US farm industry. If the commercial demand were there, the prices would be naturally higher than the subsidy levels, at which point farmers would take the sales, not the subsidy, thank you. See the last couple of years' corn market as a good example of this. But the real prices still remain low.

This is a lot like the argument for vegetarianism that runs: "Meat takes more land to raise than grain. Therefore, if we just stopped eating meat, we would have a lot more farm land available, and world hunger would therefore be solved!"

World hunger is not a problem of globally-limited natural resources, even in our current usage -- it's an economic problem. The have-nots don't have any, and therefore can't get any. To the point of death.